Why don’t the worlds of mainstream tech and accessibility tech ever seem to collide? Shelly Brisbin, who keeps one foot in each, wants to know. She and her guests from both worlds chew over the news and trends of the day, mixing in an accessibility perspective.

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#63: The Standards Can't Tell You Where Delight Is

November 23rd, 2021 · 31 minutes

Christin Hemphill works with companies to build inclusive experiences for customers and employees. That's a fancy way of saying that your bank, your onboarding materials and your VR game should all be accessible to you.

#62: UX Design and Cognitive Disability

November 9th, 2021 · 49 minutes

Rain Michaels wears many hats. She is the UX designer behind Google’s Action Blocks and the new enhanced Select-to-Speak features on Chrome OS. As if that weren’t enough, she is also one of the maintainers for accessibility on the community-developed Drupal content management system, and she is a co-chair of W3C’s Cognitive Accessibility task forc…

#61: How to Make Extended Reality an Accessible Reality

October 26th, 2021 · 29 minutes

Excitement about the ways virtual reality, augmented reality and mixed reality could change our sensory experience of the world is palpable in some communities. But for people with accessibility needs, the very centrality of sensory experience can seem like a barrier. Designers and developers are working to change the perception and the reality of…

#60: Tech Inclusion and Indigenous Peoples

October 14th, 2021 · 42 minutes

Indigenous people often face an array of barriers to economic opportunity. Poverty, oppression and simple lack of access to the Internet service are among them. We'll talk about expanding opportunity through education, career preparation and extension of broadband to indigenous communities in Canada. What you'll hear applies to any population whos…

#59: Apple Event: Takes Served at a Pleasing Temperature

September 21st, 2021 · 63 minutes

Three Apple news junkies give the company's fall product announcement event a few days to settle. We weigh in on all the new hardware announcements and what we imagine could come next.

#58: #GAAD: Beyond the Hashtag

September 15th, 2021 · 38 minutes

Ten years ago, a pair of accessibility advocates decided to bring attention to the need for better accessibility in digital realms. They created Global Accessibility Awareness Day, or #GAAD. The annual event now attracts participation from Fortune 500 companies, including Apple, Google and Microsoft. But according to cofounder Joe Devon, #GAAD is …

#57: Web Accessibility Testing on Mobile

August 17th, 2021 · 47 minutes

Mobile and desktop accessibility are similar, but different, just as mobile browsers can show the same pages desktop ones can, but with different interfaces and quirks. On this episode, we're talking about how to use mobile tools to test the accessibility of Web sites in iOS. My guest is the author of the [#a11ytools](https://apps.apple.com/us/app…

#56: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Tech

August 3rd, 2021 · 61 minutes

Beyond the checkboxes and status reports that tally the numbers of women, people of color, and (on rare occasions) people with disabilities an organization has hired, are the lived experiences of individuals who seek to thrive in a variety of STEM careers. We discuss these topics and lots more with an educator, an engineer and an advocate for mean…

#55: I Think I'm Part of a MISSION

July 20th, 2021 · 34 minutes

NASA's Chandra X-Ray Observatory has a bird's-eye view of exploding stars, black holes and other distant astronomical phenomenon. Part of interpreting the massive amounts of data the telescope collects is creating data visualizations. But how can someone who is blind or visually impaired share in the beauty and the science of the images Chandra da…

#54: Indoor Navigation: We're Working on the Sighted Experience

July 6th, 2021 · 28 minutes

Tech-assisted navigation means more than using your phone or other GPS-equipped device to find your way outside. Improving indoor navigation has long been a project for people with blindness and low vision, but its importance is growing for venues and tech companies, too.