Ungeniused is a show dedicated to covering the weirdest articles found on Wikipedia. Stephen Hackett and Myke Hurley are here to explain topics and share knowledge you'll never be able to use in real life.

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Latest Episodes

#50: Pez

April 10th, 2018 · 10 minutes

Everyone's favorite pocketable candy has a long history of making people smile.

#49: Death by Coconut

March 27th, 2018 · 10 minutes

A falling coconut can be deadly, but it's not as common as a tragedy as the press makes it out to be.

#48: The Boeing 2707: America’s Answer to Concorde

March 13th, 2018 · 14 minutes

America wasn't going to take Europe's supersonic transport project lying down. The federal government helped fund the Boeing 2707, a response to Concorde that would never fly.

#47: The New England Vampire Panic

March 6th, 2018 · 8 minutes

Today, we all know vampires are fictional, but in the late 1800s, many believed they inflicted disease on their still-alive family members.

#46: The Presidential State Car

February 28th, 2018 · 10 minutes

Sitting Presidents have a pretty set of wheels, but they aren't allowed to drive.

#45: Valentine's Day

February 14th, 2018 · 11 minutes

Is it a day to celebrate love, or a scam by greeting card companies? Dive into this and the weird history of Valentine's Day this week with Stephen and Myke, who neglected to exchange gifts to mark the holiday.

#44: The Great Pacific Garbage Patch and Friendly Floatees

January 31st, 2018 · 12 minutes

The Pacific Ocean may be home to a giant soupy mass of plastic and chemicals, but far more adorable litter has ridden its waves in the past, too.

#43: Emoji

January 24th, 2018 · 17 minutes

Stephen is joined by Jeremy Burge, the founder of Emojipedia, to discuss the small images that define so many of our digital conversations.

#42: Helicopter Prison Escapes

January 17th, 2018 · 14 minutes

Prison escapes via helicopter may seem cool, but they rarely end well.

#41: Y2K

January 3rd, 2018 · 15 minutes

It was feared that the year 2000 would arrive with worldwide calamity as the computers in our homes to the systems running our nation's power grid and nuclear power plants ground to a halt. Thankfully, that didn't happen, thanks to the work of software engineers... or luck. Maybe both.